Nagpur Travel Guide

 

 

 

places to visit




* Ambazari lake and garden
* Shri Ganesha Temple near Railway station
* Mata mandir in Koradi is near from Nagpur
* Dragon Temple in Kamptee
* Shri Shantinath Jain Temple in Ramtek
* Telankadi or Futala Lake.
* Kasturchand Park.
* The botanical gardens.
* Shukrawari Lake.
* Telankhedi Hanuman Temple & Gardens.
* Telankhedi Shiv Mandir.
* Ramtek fort temple is near from Nagpur.
* Dhamma Chakra stupa(Diksha Bhumi).
* Taj Bagh
* RSS headquarter at Reshimbagh.
* Raman Science Center
* Maharaj Bagh
* Lake garden Sakkardara.
* Japanese rose garden
* Musical Garden
* Seminary Hills & Air Force Station
* Parsi Cemetery
* NEERI Campus
* Pavnar (About 50 km westwards from Nagpur)
* Sadar Nagpur
* Bohra Masjid it is very big and beautiful mosque, at Itwari
* It has world class cricket Stadium controlled by Vidarbha Cricket Association, popularly known as "VCA".



 

 


Buy

During summers don't forget to buy Oranges. Nagpur is easily called "Orange City" of India. If you are missing summer, then try Orange Burfi, a milk based sweet with orange flavor.

Itwari, Sitabuldi, Sadar and Dharampeth areas are especially known as shopping areas due to the large number of shops and pavement hawkers in these areas. Bargain is MUST incase you are not familiar with the area. Sunday Foot path market is a very good market at Sitabuldi for shopping household things.

Nagpur is also famous for Cotton articles. Various handicrafts mostly cotton based can be purchased from Sitabuldi, Itwari

 

 

 




Nāgpu
r  isa city in the state of Maharashtra, and is the largest city in central India and also the third largest city by population in the state of Maharashtra. With a population of around 2,420,000; Nagpur UA is the 13th largest urban conglomeration in India, the 114th largest city in world, and the 143rd largest urban area in world in terms of
population. The city is also the seat of annual winter session of
Maharashtra Vidhan Sabha. Nagpur is also the major commercial and
political center of the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, and is also
famous throughout the country as "Orange City" for being a major trade
center of oranges. The city assumes political importance from being
the headquarters for the Hindu nationalist organisation RSS and an
important location for the Dalit Buddhist movement.
Nagpur lies precisely at the center of the country with the Zero mile
marker (indicating the geographical center of India) located here.[6]
The city was founded by Gond people but later became part of Maratha
Empire under the Bhonsles. The British East India Company took over
Nagpur in 19th century and made it the capital of Central Provinces and
Berar. After first states' reorganisation, the city lost the capital
status but as per informal "Nagpur Pact" between political leaders; was
made the second capital of Maharashtra.






History

.

Human existence around present day Nagpur city can be traced back 3000 years to 8th century BC. Mehir burial sites at Drugdhamna (near Mhada colony) indicate megalithic culture existed around Nagpur and is still followed in present times[8]. The first reference to the name Nagpur is found in a 10th century copper-plate inscription discovered at Devali in the neighbouring Wardha district. The inscription is a record of grant of a village situated in the visaya (district) of Nagpura-Nandivardhana during time of Rastrakuta king Krsna III in the Saka year 862 (940 CE).[9] Towards the end of third century King Vindhyasakti is known to have ruled the Nagpur region. In the 4th century Vakataka Dynasty ruled over the Nagpur region and surrounding areas and had good relations with the Gupta Empire. The Vakataka king Prithvisena I moved his capital to Nagardhan (ancient name Nandivardhana), located at 28 kilometers (17 mi) from Nagpur.[10]

Recent history ascribes the founding of Nagpur to Bakht Buland, a prince of the Gond kingdom of Deogarh in the Chhindwara district. In 1743, the Maratha leader Raghoji Bhonsle of Vidarbha established himself at Nagpur, after conquering the territories of Deogarh, Chanda and Chhattisgarh by 1751. After Raghoji's death in 1755, his son and successor Janoji was forced to acknowledge the effective supremacy of the Maratha Peshwa of Pune in 1769. Regardless of the military conquests, the Nagpur state continued to grow. Janoji's successor Mudhoji I (d. 1788) came to power in 1785 and bought Mandla and the upper Narmada valley from the Peshwa between 1796 and 1798, after which Raghoji II (d. 1816) acquired Hoshangabad, the larger part of Saugor and Damoh. Under Raghoji II, Nagpur covered what is now the east of Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Orissa, and parts of Madhya Pradesh and Jharkhand.

In 1803 Raghoji II joined the Peshwas against the British in the Second Anglo-Maratha War. The British prevailed, and Raghoji was forced to cede Cuttack, Sambalpur, and a part of Berar. After Raghoji II's death in 1816, his son Parsaji was deposed and murdered by Mudhoji II. Despite the fact that he had entered into a treaty with the British in the same year, Mudhoji joined the Peshwa in the Third Anglo-Maratha War in 1817 against the British, but was forced to cede the rest of Berar to the Nizam of Hyderabad, and parts of Saugor and Damoh, Mandla, Betul, Seoni and the Narmada valley to the British after suffering a defeat at Sitabuldi in modern-day Nagpur city. The Sitabuldi fort was the site of a fierce battle between the British and the Bhonsle of Nagpur in 1817. The battle was a turning point as it laid the foundations of the downfall of the Bhonsles and paved the way for the British acquisition of Nagpur city.[11] Mudhoji was deposed after a temporary restoration to the throne, after which the British placed Raghoji III the grandchild of Raghoji II, on the throne. During the rule of Raghoji III (which lasted till 1840), the region was administered by a British resident. In 1853, the British took control of Nagpur after Raghoji III died without leaving an heir.
Map of Nagpur district with major towns and rivers.

From 1853 to 1861, the Nagpur Province (which consisted of the present Nagpur region, Chhindwara, and Chhatisgarh) became part of the Central Provinces and Berar and came under the administration of a commissioner under the British central government, with Nagpur as its capital. Berar was added in 1903. Tata group started the country's first textile mill at Nagpur[12], formally known as Central India Spinning and Weaving Company Ltd. The company was popularly known as "Empress Mills" as it was inaugurated on 1 January 1877, the day queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India. Political activity in Nagpur during India's freedom struggle included hosting of two annual sessions of the Indian National Congress. Importantly, the Non-cooperation movement was launched in the Nagpur session of 1920. The city witnessed a Hindu–Muslim riot in 1923 which had profound impact on K. B. Hedgewar[13], who in 1925 founded the RSS, a Hindu nationalist organization in Nagpur with an idea of creating a Hindu nation. After the 1927 Nagpur riots RSS gained further popularity in Nagpur and the organization grew nationwide.

After Indian Independence in 1947, Central Provinces and Berar became a province of India, and in 1950 became the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, again with Nagpur as its capital. However when the Indian states were reorganized along linguistic lines in 1956, the Nagpur region and Berar were transferred to Bombay state, which in 1960 was split between the states of Maharashtra and Gujarat. At a formal public ceremony on October 14, 1956 in Nagpur B. R. Ambedkar along with his supporters converted to Buddhism starting Dalit Buddhist movement which is still active. In 1994, the city witnessed its most violent day in modern times in form of Gowari stampede deaths.

 

 

get there and around

 

Railways Transport

Due to its central location in India, the Nagpur Railway Station is an important railway junction and a transit terminal for trains that connect the country lengthwise and breadthwise, especially trains connecting India's major metropolises, Mumbai to Howrah-Kolkata, Delhi and Jammu to Chennai, Hydrabad, Bangalore and Kanyakumari in the South, as well as western cities such as Pune and Ahemedabad. The city is the Divisional Head Quarters for the Central Railway and South East Central Railway Zone of Indian Railways.


Road Transport


Nagpur is also a major junction for roadways as India's two major national highways, Kanyakumari-Varanasi (NH 7) and Hajira-Kolkata (NH-6), passing through the city.[ One more highway number 69 connect Nagpur to Obaidullaganj near Bhopal. Nagpur is at the junction of two Asian Highways namely AH43 Agra to Matara, Sri Lanka and AH46 connecting Kharagpur, India to Dhule, India. Auto rickshaws operate in most parts of Nagpur and are the main form of hired transport within the city.

The new national highway is being built between Nagpur and Mumbai, alternative to the existing NH 6. This new Nagpur-Aurangabad-Mumbai express highway is build on the national highway basis, though being the state highway, entirely inside the state of Maharashtra. This highway will be a major boost to the under developed regions of Vidarbha and Marathwada in Maharashtra state.
Nagpur's Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar International Airport has the busiest Air traffic control room of India.




Air Transport


Nagpur's Air Traffic Control (ATC) is the busiest in India, with more than 300 international flights flying over the city every day in 2004. In October 2005, Nagpur's erstwhile Sonegaon Airport was declared an international airport and was renamed Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar International Airport.[59] Country's first ever international cargo hub, the Multi-modal International Cargo Hub and Airport at Nagpur (MIHAN) is planned on the outskirts of the city.